Quadriceps muscle isokinetic strength and radiographic outcomes of former professional athletes 20 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction
Author(s):
Koovit T. (Estonia)
,
Koovit T. (Estonia)
Affiliations:
Luik M.
,
Luik M.
Affiliations:
Pääsuke Maarja
,
Pääsuke Maarja
Affiliations:
Kumm Jaanika
,
Kumm Jaanika
Affiliations:
Rips L.
,
Rips L.
Affiliations:
Rahu M.
,
Rahu M.
Affiliations:
Gapeyeva Helena
Gapeyeva Helena
Affiliations:
ESSKA Academy. Koovit T. 05/09/18; 209418; P05-798 Topic: Arthroscopic Surgery
Tauno Koovit
Tauno Koovit
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Abstract
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Objectives: Aim of the study was to investigate quadriceps muscle strength and radiographic outcomes to tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis of former professional athletes 20 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). We hypothesized that operated leg has lower quadriceps muscle strength and more developed knee joint osteoarthritis compared to non-operated leg.

Methods: Nine men aged (mean ± SD) 48.4 ± 5.7 years, BMI 27.2 ± 2.4 kg/m2 were retrospectively studied 20 years after ACLR. All of the participants were level-A athletes at the time of the injury. Additional meniscal or chondral injuries of the knee joint at the time of reconstruction were detected in 6 participants (66.7%). All of the ACLR were made by the same orthopaedic surgeon in the period from 1996 to 1998 and bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was used. Quadriceps muscle isokinetic strength for 60 deg/s and 180 deg/s was measured and H:Q ratio was calculated. Single leg hop test was performed for both legs. Knee joint radiographs were investigated bilaterally and classified by the Kellgren and Lawrence classification. For statistical analysis Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Pearson correlation coefficient were computed.

Results: H:Q ratio at 60 deg/s was 0.83 ± 0.11 and 0.77 ± 0.08 and at 180 deg/s was 0.78 ± 0.14 and 0.72 ± 0.07 of operated and non-operated leg, respectively. No significant difference was noted between isokinetic peak torque of knee flexion and extension as well as in H:Q ratio between operated and non-operated leg. Single leg hop test distance did not differ between operated and non-operated leg (111.6 ± 16.6 cm and 112.4 ± 16.2, respectively).
Knee osteoarthritis was more developed (P < 0.05) in both, TF and PF joints for operated knees as compared to non-operated knees. None of the subjects had grade 4 osteoarthritis in neither of their knees. 44% of the operated knees had grade 3 osteoarthritis in both TF and PF joints whereas non-operated knees had no grade 3 osteoarthritis in TF joint and only 11% of grade 3 osteoarthritis in PF joint.

Conclusions: In the present study the isokinetic strength characteristics and single leg hop test results did not differ between operated and non-operated leg, despite previous study show 10% difference in strength and power up to 20 years after ACLR between injured and non-injuried extremities (Tengman et al, 2014). Following ACLR operated knees had more radiographically developed osteoarthritis than non-operated knees.

Keywords:
Knee joint, ACL reconstruction, osteoarthritis, sportsmen, thigh muscle strength
Objectives: Aim of the study was to investigate quadriceps muscle strength and radiographic outcomes to tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis of former professional athletes 20 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). We hypothesized that operated leg has lower quadriceps muscle strength and more developed knee joint osteoarthritis compared to non-operated leg.

Methods: Nine men aged (mean ± SD) 48.4 ± 5.7 years, BMI 27.2 ± 2.4 kg/m2 were retrospectively studied 20 years after ACLR. All of the participants were level-A athletes at the time of the injury. Additional meniscal or chondral injuries of the knee joint at the time of reconstruction were detected in 6 participants (66.7%). All of the ACLR were made by the same orthopaedic surgeon in the period from 1996 to 1998 and bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was used. Quadriceps muscle isokinetic strength for 60 deg/s and 180 deg/s was measured and H:Q ratio was calculated. Single leg hop test was performed for both legs. Knee joint radiographs were investigated bilaterally and classified by the Kellgren and Lawrence classification. For statistical analysis Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Pearson correlation coefficient were computed.

Results: H:Q ratio at 60 deg/s was 0.83 ± 0.11 and 0.77 ± 0.08 and at 180 deg/s was 0.78 ± 0.14 and 0.72 ± 0.07 of operated and non-operated leg, respectively. No significant difference was noted between isokinetic peak torque of knee flexion and extension as well as in H:Q ratio between operated and non-operated leg. Single leg hop test distance did not differ between operated and non-operated leg (111.6 ± 16.6 cm and 112.4 ± 16.2, respectively).
Knee osteoarthritis was more developed (P < 0.05) in both, TF and PF joints for operated knees as compared to non-operated knees. None of the subjects had grade 4 osteoarthritis in neither of their knees. 44% of the operated knees had grade 3 osteoarthritis in both TF and PF joints whereas non-operated knees had no grade 3 osteoarthritis in TF joint and only 11% of grade 3 osteoarthritis in PF joint.

Conclusions: In the present study the isokinetic strength characteristics and single leg hop test results did not differ between operated and non-operated leg, despite previous study show 10% difference in strength and power up to 20 years after ACLR between injured and non-injuried extremities (Tengman et al, 2014). Following ACLR operated knees had more radiographically developed osteoarthritis than non-operated knees.

Keywords:
Knee joint, ACL reconstruction, osteoarthritis, sportsmen, thigh muscle strength
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