Knee Extension Deficit negatively affects return to sport criteria after ACL reconstruction
Author(s):
Harput Gulcan (Turkey)
,
Harput Gulcan (Turkey)
Affiliations:
Eraslan Leyla
,
Eraslan Leyla
Affiliations:
Yildiz T.
,
Yildiz T.
Affiliations:
ULUSOY B.
,
ULUSOY B.
Affiliations:
DEMIRCI S.
,
DEMIRCI S.
Affiliations:
BAYRAKCI TUNAY Volga
BAYRAKCI TUNAY Volga
Affiliations:
ESSKA Academy. HARPUT G. 05/09/18; 209462; P06-1689
Dr. GULCAN HARPUT
Dr. GULCAN HARPUT
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You can access free regular educational content on the ESSKA Academy by registering as an 'ESSKA Academy User’ here

Access to Premium content is currently a membership benefit.

Click here to join ESSKA or renew your membership.
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Objectives: Quadriceps strength recovery and functional performance are commonly evaluated prior to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, few studies have documented potential knee extension range of motion (ROM) deficit after ACLR, or ascertained the relative contribution of knee extension ROM deficit to quadriceps strength and functional performance. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between knee ROM at 4 weeks post-surgery and return to sport criteria evaluated by concentric and eccentric quadriceps strength, hop performance limb symmetry indices and self-reported knee function in patients with ACL reconstruction.

Methods: Forty patients (mean age: 28.25 ± 8 years, BMI: 25.7 ± 3.6 kg/m2) who had undergone ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft were included in the study. All patients followed the same rehabilitation program. Demographic characteristics of patients and knee extension ROM deficit were recorded at 4 weeks post-surgery. When they reached return to sport phase after surgery concentric and eccentric quadriceps strength was measured. Functional performance was evaluated by one leg hop test (OLHT), Vertical Jump Test (VJT) and International Knee Documentary Committee (IKDC). The ability of knee extension ROM at 4th weeks after surgery in relation with quadriceps strength and hop performance symmetry index at RTS phase was analyzed using Pearson Correlation Test.

Results: Sixty-six percent of patients had a knee extension ROM deficit at 4th weeks after surgery. Limb symmetry indexes of patients, concentric quadriceps index at 1800/s was found 80.6%, at 600/s was found 80%, eccentric quadriceps index at 600/s was found 75%, self reported knee function was found 75% and hop performance was found 86%. Knee extension ROM deficit is negatively correlated with concentric quadriceps strength ratio at 1800/s (p= 0.006, r= -0.477, r2=0.228), at 600/s (p= 0.022, r= -0.403, r2=0.163), eccentric quadriceps strength ratio at 600/s (p= 0.002, r= -0.554, r2=0.307), IKDC (p= 0.035, r= -0.400, r2=0.160) and VJT (p= 0.027, r= -0.425, r2=0.181).

Conclusions: This study shows that knee ROM extension deficit negatively affect the concentric and eccentric quadriceps strength recovery in ACL reconstructed patients. Based on these findings, to resolve between limb strength deficits and functional performance clinicians should take into consideration knee extension ROM deficit early phase of rehabilitation.

Keywords:
Limb symmetry index, quadriceps, extension deficit, anterior cruciate ligament
Objectives: Quadriceps strength recovery and functional performance are commonly evaluated prior to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, few studies have documented potential knee extension range of motion (ROM) deficit after ACLR, or ascertained the relative contribution of knee extension ROM deficit to quadriceps strength and functional performance. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between knee ROM at 4 weeks post-surgery and return to sport criteria evaluated by concentric and eccentric quadriceps strength, hop performance limb symmetry indices and self-reported knee function in patients with ACL reconstruction.

Methods: Forty patients (mean age: 28.25 ± 8 years, BMI: 25.7 ± 3.6 kg/m2) who had undergone ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft were included in the study. All patients followed the same rehabilitation program. Demographic characteristics of patients and knee extension ROM deficit were recorded at 4 weeks post-surgery. When they reached return to sport phase after surgery concentric and eccentric quadriceps strength was measured. Functional performance was evaluated by one leg hop test (OLHT), Vertical Jump Test (VJT) and International Knee Documentary Committee (IKDC). The ability of knee extension ROM at 4th weeks after surgery in relation with quadriceps strength and hop performance symmetry index at RTS phase was analyzed using Pearson Correlation Test.

Results: Sixty-six percent of patients had a knee extension ROM deficit at 4th weeks after surgery. Limb symmetry indexes of patients, concentric quadriceps index at 1800/s was found 80.6%, at 600/s was found 80%, eccentric quadriceps index at 600/s was found 75%, self reported knee function was found 75% and hop performance was found 86%. Knee extension ROM deficit is negatively correlated with concentric quadriceps strength ratio at 1800/s (p= 0.006, r= -0.477, r2=0.228), at 600/s (p= 0.022, r= -0.403, r2=0.163), eccentric quadriceps strength ratio at 600/s (p= 0.002, r= -0.554, r2=0.307), IKDC (p= 0.035, r= -0.400, r2=0.160) and VJT (p= 0.027, r= -0.425, r2=0.181).

Conclusions: This study shows that knee ROM extension deficit negatively affect the concentric and eccentric quadriceps strength recovery in ACL reconstructed patients. Based on these findings, to resolve between limb strength deficits and functional performance clinicians should take into consideration knee extension ROM deficit early phase of rehabilitation.

Keywords:
Limb symmetry index, quadriceps, extension deficit, anterior cruciate ligament
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies