Complications after reconstruction of isolated ACL injuries: a prospective study of 958 cases with 2 years follow-up
Author(s):
Makridis K. (Greece)
,
Makridis K. (Greece)
Affiliations:
Rousseau R.
,
Rousseau R.
Affiliations:
Zourntou Mantina
,
Zourntou Mantina
Affiliations:
Djian P.
Djian P.
Affiliations:
ESSKA Academy. Makridis K. 05/09/18; 209518; P07-567
Mr. Konstantinos Makridis
Mr. Konstantinos Makridis
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Abstract
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Objectives: The rate of complications or adverse events following an ACL reconstruction is underestimated. There is a paucity of studies in the current literature and the majority of them do not absolutely focus on the problem. Aim of the study was to describe the 2-year complications and adverse events following an ACL reconstruction and analyze them on the basis of the type of the graft.

Methods: From 2000 to 2012, 958 patients with an isolated ACL injury were operated by a single knee surgeon. ACL reconstruction was performed with the medial portal technique for the femoral tunnel and the use of bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstrings-graft. Patients were reviewed at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 24 months after ACL reconstruction with plain-radiographs and KT-1000 measurements.

Results: Of 958 patients enrolled, 147 (15%) were lost at the last follow-up. The bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was used in 257 patients and the hamstrings-graft in 554. The 2 groups were similar regarding the mean age at the time of surgery and preoperative anterior laxity.
The main complications were: anterior knee pain (AKP) (n = 131/811, 16%), stiffness
(n = 73/811, 9%), secondary meniscal lesions (n = 59/811, 7.2%), pain due to fixation (n = 79/811, 9%), ACL re-rupture (n = 43/811, 5.3%), contralateral ACL ruptures (n = 24 / 811, 3%), patella fractures (n = 3/811), infections and thrombo-embolic complications (n = 9/811, 1%).

Conclusions: Isolated ACL injuries can be successfully treated either with a hamstring or a patellar tendon graft. However, the complications differ between the two groups and the patients must be carefully informed regarding the type and incidence of any future adverse event.

Keywords:
isolated ACL injuries, reconstruction, complications
Objectives: The rate of complications or adverse events following an ACL reconstruction is underestimated. There is a paucity of studies in the current literature and the majority of them do not absolutely focus on the problem. Aim of the study was to describe the 2-year complications and adverse events following an ACL reconstruction and analyze them on the basis of the type of the graft.

Methods: From 2000 to 2012, 958 patients with an isolated ACL injury were operated by a single knee surgeon. ACL reconstruction was performed with the medial portal technique for the femoral tunnel and the use of bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstrings-graft. Patients were reviewed at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 24 months after ACL reconstruction with plain-radiographs and KT-1000 measurements.

Results: Of 958 patients enrolled, 147 (15%) were lost at the last follow-up. The bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was used in 257 patients and the hamstrings-graft in 554. The 2 groups were similar regarding the mean age at the time of surgery and preoperative anterior laxity.
The main complications were: anterior knee pain (AKP) (n = 131/811, 16%), stiffness
(n = 73/811, 9%), secondary meniscal lesions (n = 59/811, 7.2%), pain due to fixation (n = 79/811, 9%), ACL re-rupture (n = 43/811, 5.3%), contralateral ACL ruptures (n = 24 / 811, 3%), patella fractures (n = 3/811), infections and thrombo-embolic complications (n = 9/811, 1%).

Conclusions: Isolated ACL injuries can be successfully treated either with a hamstring or a patellar tendon graft. However, the complications differ between the two groups and the patients must be carefully informed regarding the type and incidence of any future adverse event.

Keywords:
isolated ACL injuries, reconstruction, complications
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