Comparison of Posterior Tibial Slope measured on MRI with measured on x-rays.
Author(s):
Szymanski T. (Poland)
,
Szymanski T. (Poland)
Affiliations:
Zdanowicz Urszula
,
Zdanowicz Urszula
Affiliations:
Rychtik P.
Rychtik P.
Affiliations:
ESSKA Academy. Szyma###ski T. 05/09/18; 209674; P11-1915
Mr. Tomasz Szyma###ski
Mr. Tomasz Szyma###ski
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Abstract
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Objectives: The posterior tibial slope(PTS) has a big influence on the kinematics of the knee joint. Has been reported in numerously studies that PTS may be associated with increased likelihood of osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Despite the influence of the PTS on knee biomechanics, the assessment in clinical routine work is difficult because of a quantity of methods to evaluate PTS. Several methods are used on conventional radiographs, MRI and CT scans, but there is no standard validated method. A better understanding of the significance of the tibial slope could improve the development of ACL injury screening and prevention programmes and could also be very important in the preoperative planning of slope-decreasing osteotomies in the treatment of the unstable knee joint with ACL insufficiency.
Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the lateral and medial posterior tibial slope on MRI using midpoint method and to compare the values with the X-ray method of the same knee.

Methods: Measurement of the medial and lateral PTS was done in the 100 consecutive MRI of the knee joint using midpoint method and compared with PTS values evaluated on the true lateral radiographs of the same knee joint. Our patients were randomly selected from the database of our clinic. We include 39 females and 61 males. The mean age of our patients was 37,3 years old. The exclusion criteria were IV degree of chondromalation in the joint. We were searching for the differences in the values of the same knee measured on the MRI and X-ray. We also calculated the correlation between medial and lateral tibial slope measured on the MRI and X-rays.

Results: We have presented the results of both methods of measurements with the distinction for medial tibial slope and lateral tibial slope. We have compared correlations of all measurements and we have calculated the margin of error.

Conclusions: Knowledge of the correlation between the true measurement of the PTS(MRI) and x-ray method measurement have clinical relevance when performing the slope decreasing osteotomies. Orthopaedic surgeons should consider which method chose for the measuring the PTS as part of the preoperative assessment, it might have an influence on the degrees of the osteotomy.

Keywords:
tibial slope, x-ray, MRI, knee
Objectives: The posterior tibial slope(PTS) has a big influence on the kinematics of the knee joint. Has been reported in numerously studies that PTS may be associated with increased likelihood of osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Despite the influence of the PTS on knee biomechanics, the assessment in clinical routine work is difficult because of a quantity of methods to evaluate PTS. Several methods are used on conventional radiographs, MRI and CT scans, but there is no standard validated method. A better understanding of the significance of the tibial slope could improve the development of ACL injury screening and prevention programmes and could also be very important in the preoperative planning of slope-decreasing osteotomies in the treatment of the unstable knee joint with ACL insufficiency.
Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the lateral and medial posterior tibial slope on MRI using midpoint method and to compare the values with the X-ray method of the same knee.

Methods: Measurement of the medial and lateral PTS was done in the 100 consecutive MRI of the knee joint using midpoint method and compared with PTS values evaluated on the true lateral radiographs of the same knee joint. Our patients were randomly selected from the database of our clinic. We include 39 females and 61 males. The mean age of our patients was 37,3 years old. The exclusion criteria were IV degree of chondromalation in the joint. We were searching for the differences in the values of the same knee measured on the MRI and X-ray. We also calculated the correlation between medial and lateral tibial slope measured on the MRI and X-rays.

Results: We have presented the results of both methods of measurements with the distinction for medial tibial slope and lateral tibial slope. We have compared correlations of all measurements and we have calculated the margin of error.

Conclusions: Knowledge of the correlation between the true measurement of the PTS(MRI) and x-ray method measurement have clinical relevance when performing the slope decreasing osteotomies. Orthopaedic surgeons should consider which method chose for the measuring the PTS as part of the preoperative assessment, it might have an influence on the degrees of the osteotomy.

Keywords:
tibial slope, x-ray, MRI, knee
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