Biceps Tenotomy In Frozen Shoulder
Author(s):
Morsy M. (Egypt)
Morsy M. (Egypt)
Affiliations:
ESSKA Academy. Morsy M. 05/09/18; 209873; P21-1113 Topic: I2 - Arthroscopic capsular release
Prof. Dr. Mohamed Morsy
Prof. Dr. Mohamed Morsy
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Abstract
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Objectives: Arthroscopic capsular release in refractory cases of primary frozen shoulder is considered a suitable option that leads to a faster recovery. Nevertheless, light was not shed on the effect of the addition of biceps tenotomy on the postoperative outcome. The purpose of this prospective study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic capsular release in frozen shoulder with and without biceps tenotomy.

Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with primary frozen shoulder in whom conservative medical, physiotherapy and/or local steroid injection failed to relieve the symptoms were included in the study. Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all cases. Whereas group 1 (30 patients) had the standard anterior and posterior release only, group 2 (30 patients) included an additional tenotomy of the long head of biceps. Constant-Murley and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) functional scores as well as the Satisfactory Outcome Score were used to assess the overall outcome and patient satisfaction.

Results: The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range, 41 to 65 years), with no statistical difference between the 2 groups. The mean follow-up period was 19 months (range, 12 to 26 months). At the final follow up, there was a significant postoperative improvement in the functional scores (P < .001) of both groups. A similar finding was noted in the overall range of motions (P < .001). However, Group 2 experienced a 4 to 6 month postoperative anterior shoulder pain localized at the bicepital groove.

Conclusions: A global rapid significant improvement in the range of motion and patient satisfaction has been shown following arthroscopic capsular release for resistant frozen shoulder. However, there is no significant difference in the overall results with the addition of a biceps tenotomy.

Keywords:
Biceps Tenotomy - Frozen shoulder- Capsular release
Objectives: Arthroscopic capsular release in refractory cases of primary frozen shoulder is considered a suitable option that leads to a faster recovery. Nevertheless, light was not shed on the effect of the addition of biceps tenotomy on the postoperative outcome. The purpose of this prospective study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic capsular release in frozen shoulder with and without biceps tenotomy.

Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with primary frozen shoulder in whom conservative medical, physiotherapy and/or local steroid injection failed to relieve the symptoms were included in the study. Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all cases. Whereas group 1 (30 patients) had the standard anterior and posterior release only, group 2 (30 patients) included an additional tenotomy of the long head of biceps. Constant-Murley and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) functional scores as well as the Satisfactory Outcome Score were used to assess the overall outcome and patient satisfaction.

Results: The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range, 41 to 65 years), with no statistical difference between the 2 groups. The mean follow-up period was 19 months (range, 12 to 26 months). At the final follow up, there was a significant postoperative improvement in the functional scores (P < .001) of both groups. A similar finding was noted in the overall range of motions (P < .001). However, Group 2 experienced a 4 to 6 month postoperative anterior shoulder pain localized at the bicepital groove.

Conclusions: A global rapid significant improvement in the range of motion and patient satisfaction has been shown following arthroscopic capsular release for resistant frozen shoulder. However, there is no significant difference in the overall results with the addition of a biceps tenotomy.

Keywords:
Biceps Tenotomy - Frozen shoulder- Capsular release
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