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Does the difference between templated and intraoperatively achieved posterior tibial slope affect the patient satisfaction after unicompartmental knee replacement? - a pilot study
ESSKA Academy. Serdar J. Nov 8, 2019; 284363; epEKA-18 Topic: Knee
Dr. Jure Serdar
Dr. Jure Serdar
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Does the difference between templated and intraoperatively achieved posterior tibial slope affect the patient satisfaction after unicompartmental knee replacement? - a pilot study

ePoster - epEKA-18

Topic: UKA

Serdar J.1, Josipović M.1, Plećko M.1, Samošćanec S.2, Jelić M.1
1Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb, Orthopedics Department, Zagreb, Croatia, 2University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia

Introduction: When performing the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) the guiding thought is to restore normal knee kinematics. One of the factors that affect the knee kinematics is the posterior tibial slope (PTS). Therefore, our intraoperative goal is to match the natural slope. In this pilot study we wanted to examine the difference between preoperatively measured PTS and the PTS after UKA and does it affect the patient satisfaction.
Material and methods: Thirty-nine patients who underwent medial UKA in Department for Orthopaedics at University Hospital Centre Zagreb, in period between June 2017 and February 2018, were retrospectively evaluated. All patients preoperatively did AP weight bearing and lateral view radiograph of both knees and postoperatively AP and lateral radiograph of operated knee. We measured PTS on both pre- and postoperative radiographs. The International Knee Society score and visual analogue scale for pain were used to assess the patient satisfaction.
Results: A total of 39 patients (27 females and 12 males) with mean age of 67 (range 49 - 86), underwent medial UKA. The average follow up period was 11 months (range 9-16). According to the preoperative templating our aim was to establish the natural PTS postoperatively, so any PTS different than the preoperatively measured was considered as an intraoperative fault. The average difference between preoperative and intraoperatively achieved PTS was 2 (range 0-7) degrees. The patients were divided into two groups according to the PTS value as seen on lateral X-ray. Group 1 (N = 20) included patients with difference between preoperative and intraoperatively achieved PTS lesser than 2 deg., while group 2 (N = 19) included patients with difference greater than 2 deg. Mean VAS result for group 1 was 3 (range 0 - 8), while mean result for group 2 was 3 (range 0 - 7). No statistical significance was measured for VAS results between group 1 and group 2 (p = 0.8019). Mean KOOS Quality of Life (QOL) result for group 1 was 65 (range 38 - 100), while mean result for group 2 was 64 (range 0 - 94). No statistical significance was measured for KOOS Pain results between group 1 and group 2 as well.
Conclusion: The difference ≤2 degrees between preoperatively templated and intraoperatively achieved PTS does not affect patient's satisfaction after UKA in short term follow up.
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