3D kinematic analysis of the scapulothoracic motion using inertial sensors in healthy subjects and patients with rotator cuff tears
ESSKA Academy. YIANNAKOPOULOS C. 11/08/19; 284415; epESA-26 Topic: Rotator Cuff Tears
Prof. Christos YIANNAKOPOULOS
Prof. Christos YIANNAKOPOULOS
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3D kinematic analysis of the scapulothoracic motion using inertial sensors in healthy subjects and patients with rotator cuff tears

ePoster - epESA-26

Topic: Basic Science and Biomechanics

Yiannakopoulos C., Vlastos I., Theotokatos G., Zekis T., Noutsos K.
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Biomechanics Laboratory, School of Physical Education and Sport Science, Athens, Greece

Introduction: Abnormal kinematics of the scapula during shoulder elevation is one of the reasons for secondary shoulder pain. Additionally, scapular dyskinesia is commonly present, although under-appreciated, in patients with rotator cuff tears.
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify the normal and abnormal scapular motion and to quantify the presence of scapular dyskinesis using cutting edge inertial sensor technology.
Methods: Ten healthy controls and 10 patients with unilateral full thickness rotator cuff tear verified by MRI underwent evaluation of the scapulothoracic motion. Informed consent was obtained from all patients and the study was approved by our institution's ethics committee. To measure the scapulohumeral rhythm, upward rotation, elevation, internal rotation, protraction of the scapula and posterior rotation of the clavicle, 4 inertial motion units (Xsens Technologies, NL) MTw (100Hz) were used.
Sensor placement: The clavicle sensor was placed in the mid-shaft of the clavicle after measuring the longitudinal axis of the clavicle, the scapular sensor is placed on the scapular spine over its central third, the upper arm sensor was distal to the deltoid insertion and the thorax sensor was placed on the flat anterior surface of the sternum. All sensors, except this at the upper arm, has been placed over a dedicated elastic shirt.
Calculation of joint kinematics: the scapula, humerus and clavicle orientations are expressed relative to the thorax.
Results: Statistically significant differences between the painful and the healthy side were recorded in all axes. Difference of 8° degrees in the angular displacement in elevation was recorded and negative values for the upward rotation and protraction for the scapular in relation to the healthy side and around 12° degrees in posterior rotation for the clavicle. Protraction and elevation of the clavicle which are synchronous movements with the scapular movement, were recorded lower values of angular displacements and acceleration in relevance with the negative values described above.
Conclusions: Scapular kinematic can be evaluated using inertial sensors. Abnormal scapular movement is quantified using this wireless inertial sensor technology in a reliable way.
3D kinematic analysis of the scapulothoracic motion using inertial sensors in healthy subjects and patients with rotator cuff tears

ePoster - epESA-26

Topic: Basic Science and Biomechanics

Yiannakopoulos C., Vlastos I., Theotokatos G., Zekis T., Noutsos K.
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Biomechanics Laboratory, School of Physical Education and Sport Science, Athens, Greece

Introduction: Abnormal kinematics of the scapula during shoulder elevation is one of the reasons for secondary shoulder pain. Additionally, scapular dyskinesia is commonly present, although under-appreciated, in patients with rotator cuff tears.
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify the normal and abnormal scapular motion and to quantify the presence of scapular dyskinesis using cutting edge inertial sensor technology.
Methods: Ten healthy controls and 10 patients with unilateral full thickness rotator cuff tear verified by MRI underwent evaluation of the scapulothoracic motion. Informed consent was obtained from all patients and the study was approved by our institution's ethics committee. To measure the scapulohumeral rhythm, upward rotation, elevation, internal rotation, protraction of the scapula and posterior rotation of the clavicle, 4 inertial motion units (Xsens Technologies, NL) MTw (100Hz) were used.
Sensor placement: The clavicle sensor was placed in the mid-shaft of the clavicle after measuring the longitudinal axis of the clavicle, the scapular sensor is placed on the scapular spine over its central third, the upper arm sensor was distal to the deltoid insertion and the thorax sensor was placed on the flat anterior surface of the sternum. All sensors, except this at the upper arm, has been placed over a dedicated elastic shirt.
Calculation of joint kinematics: the scapula, humerus and clavicle orientations are expressed relative to the thorax.
Results: Statistically significant differences between the painful and the healthy side were recorded in all axes. Difference of 8° degrees in the angular displacement in elevation was recorded and negative values for the upward rotation and protraction for the scapular in relation to the healthy side and around 12° degrees in posterior rotation for the clavicle. Protraction and elevation of the clavicle which are synchronous movements with the scapular movement, were recorded lower values of angular displacements and acceleration in relevance with the negative values described above.
Conclusions: Scapular kinematic can be evaluated using inertial sensors. Abnormal scapular movement is quantified using this wireless inertial sensor technology in a reliable way.
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