Forgotten Joint Score - 12 after ACL reconstruction and factors related to high score
ESSKA Academy. Alsubaie M. 11/08/19; 284435; epESMA-25 Topic: Return to Sports
Dr. Mohammed Alsubaie
Dr. Mohammed Alsubaie
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Forgotten Joint Score - 12 after ACL reconstruction and factors related to high score

ePoster - epESMA-25

Topic: Sports Injury and Return to Competition Criteria

Alsubaie M.1, Aldawsari K.1, Aljassir F.2, Bin Nasser A.2, Alomar A.2, Aldosari S.2
1King Saud University, College Of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2King Saud University, Orthopedic Surgery, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Introduction: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a widely common performed procedure, especially in active young population, and different objective and subjective parameters measure its outcome. Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12) is a relatively new patient-reported outcome tool that was created to assess the patient's awareness of their joint after surgical intervention. A forgotten joint (less joint awareness) lacks disturbing symptoms interfering with daily activities. FJS-12 was widely used following joint replacement surgeries. The utilization of FJS-12 after ACL reconstruction surgery remains unsatisfactory in the current literature.
Objectives:
1. To estimate the mean FJS-12 score of patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and compare it with healthy controls mean.
2. To identify factors which influence the mean FJS-12 score.
Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the level of knee joint awareness after ACL reconstruction surgery using the FJS-12 score system.
Methods: January 2019, a cross-sectional study was conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients who underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of a unilateral ACL with minimum one-year follow-up were included. Patients with age less than 18 years were excluded. Demographic and medical information were obtained from electronic medical records. Patients answered the FJS-12 questionnaire through phone-calling. Healthy controls group was identified and matched for age and sex to determine the baseline score for the FJS-12 Scale. Higher FJS-12 score means better outcome (higher degree of “forgetting” the joint/ lower joint awareness). Data then analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). We considered our findings significant when p-value less 0.05.
Results: Total of 239 participants filled the questionnaire. 235 (98.3%) were males, and 4 (1.7%) were females. The mean age and BMI were 29 and 28 respectively. The FJS-12 score was 69.5 for the patient's group and 69.2 for the healthy controls without a significant difference between the two groups. Patients who were compliant with rehabilitation showed higher FJS-12 score (p=0.04).
Conclusion: Patients who underwent ACL reconstruction should expect almost similar FJS-12 mean as compared to healthy individuals at one-year follow-up, and programmed rehabilitation tend to decrease knee joint awareness after the surgery.
Forgotten Joint Score - 12 after ACL reconstruction and factors related to high score

ePoster - epESMA-25

Topic: Sports Injury and Return to Competition Criteria

Alsubaie M.1, Aldawsari K.1, Aljassir F.2, Bin Nasser A.2, Alomar A.2, Aldosari S.2
1King Saud University, College Of Medicine, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2King Saud University, Orthopedic Surgery, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Introduction: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a widely common performed procedure, especially in active young population, and different objective and subjective parameters measure its outcome. Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12) is a relatively new patient-reported outcome tool that was created to assess the patient's awareness of their joint after surgical intervention. A forgotten joint (less joint awareness) lacks disturbing symptoms interfering with daily activities. FJS-12 was widely used following joint replacement surgeries. The utilization of FJS-12 after ACL reconstruction surgery remains unsatisfactory in the current literature.
Objectives:
1. To estimate the mean FJS-12 score of patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and compare it with healthy controls mean.
2. To identify factors which influence the mean FJS-12 score.
Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the level of knee joint awareness after ACL reconstruction surgery using the FJS-12 score system.
Methods: January 2019, a cross-sectional study was conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients who underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of a unilateral ACL with minimum one-year follow-up were included. Patients with age less than 18 years were excluded. Demographic and medical information were obtained from electronic medical records. Patients answered the FJS-12 questionnaire through phone-calling. Healthy controls group was identified and matched for age and sex to determine the baseline score for the FJS-12 Scale. Higher FJS-12 score means better outcome (higher degree of “forgetting” the joint/ lower joint awareness). Data then analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). We considered our findings significant when p-value less 0.05.
Results: Total of 239 participants filled the questionnaire. 235 (98.3%) were males, and 4 (1.7%) were females. The mean age and BMI were 29 and 28 respectively. The FJS-12 score was 69.5 for the patient's group and 69.2 for the healthy controls without a significant difference between the two groups. Patients who were compliant with rehabilitation showed higher FJS-12 score (p=0.04).
Conclusion: Patients who underwent ACL reconstruction should expect almost similar FJS-12 mean as compared to healthy individuals at one-year follow-up, and programmed rehabilitation tend to decrease knee joint awareness after the surgery.
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