Rehabilitation program in adolescent athletes with spondylolysis
ESSKA Academy. Peña García M. 11/08/19; 285213; epESMA-40 Topic: Sports Related Injuries
Dra Marina Peña García
Dra Marina Peña García
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Introduction: Spondylolysis is a defect of the pars interarticularis, in children is most frecuently found in L5-S1 segment of the spine.It is generally caused by repetitive stress to the pars interarticularis commonly seen in gymnasts due to repetitive hyperextension.
The incidence of spondylolysis in the athlete child with low back pain is estimated to be as high as 47% of patients.Over time patients may develop a compensatory gait involving a forward lean and reduced hip extension, reflecting pain or weakness in the gluteal and hamstring muscles.
Initial care is usually conservative. In patients who are unable or unwilling to restrict their activity, bracing may be an option, knowing that it will only control lumbar pain and is not well tolerated by children.
Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate recent outcome of conservative treatment in a pediatric athlete patient with lumbar spondylolysis.
Aims: Our aim was to confirm the complete and satisfactory return to sport activity of an adolescent athlete treated with conservative methods.
Methods: We performed a thorough clinical and radiographic follow up of the patient and provide a revision of the literature about this topic.
Results: We present in our work the case of an 11-year-old patient who develops a professional career in gymnastics and who goes through lumbar pain of 2 months of evolution that forced to abandon training .Radiological study revealed spondylolysis L5-S1.
After a conservative treatment, consisting of decreasing intensity of activities for approximately 3 months and physical therapy focused on core strengthening, hamstring stretching, and pelvic tilt exercises always avoiding last degrees of lumbar hyperextension,our patient was able to return to her trainings after 6 months at the same level of intensity as before with no low back pain.
Conclusions: We have found that applying a conservative treatment protocol to spondylolysis in high level athletes may render satisfactory functional and symptomatic results in a moderately short time span. Our conclusions go along with other reports about similar cases found in literature.
Introduction: Spondylolysis is a defect of the pars interarticularis, in children is most frecuently found in L5-S1 segment of the spine.It is generally caused by repetitive stress to the pars interarticularis commonly seen in gymnasts due to repetitive hyperextension.
The incidence of spondylolysis in the athlete child with low back pain is estimated to be as high as 47% of patients.Over time patients may develop a compensatory gait involving a forward lean and reduced hip extension, reflecting pain or weakness in the gluteal and hamstring muscles.
Initial care is usually conservative. In patients who are unable or unwilling to restrict their activity, bracing may be an option, knowing that it will only control lumbar pain and is not well tolerated by children.
Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate recent outcome of conservative treatment in a pediatric athlete patient with lumbar spondylolysis.
Aims: Our aim was to confirm the complete and satisfactory return to sport activity of an adolescent athlete treated with conservative methods.
Methods: We performed a thorough clinical and radiographic follow up of the patient and provide a revision of the literature about this topic.
Results: We present in our work the case of an 11-year-old patient who develops a professional career in gymnastics and who goes through lumbar pain of 2 months of evolution that forced to abandon training .Radiological study revealed spondylolysis L5-S1.
After a conservative treatment, consisting of decreasing intensity of activities for approximately 3 months and physical therapy focused on core strengthening, hamstring stretching, and pelvic tilt exercises always avoiding last degrees of lumbar hyperextension,our patient was able to return to her trainings after 6 months at the same level of intensity as before with no low back pain.
Conclusions: We have found that applying a conservative treatment protocol to spondylolysis in high level athletes may render satisfactory functional and symptomatic results in a moderately short time span. Our conclusions go along with other reports about similar cases found in literature.
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