Vail hip sports test as a measure of functional strength
ESSKA Academy. Briggs K. 11/07/19; 286455; epESMA-43 Topic: Sports Related Injuries
Karen Briggs
Karen Briggs
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Abstract
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Background: Surgeons face a major challenge deciding when athletes are ready to return to sport following hip arthroscopy. Currently, few validated functional tests exist to assess sport readiness. The Vail Hip Sports Test (VHST) was developed to provide a standardized, objective metric for determining readiness to return to sport following hip arthroscopy.
Purpose: To evaluate the association between preoperative Vail Hip Sports Test scores and hip strength measurements in high level athletes (Tegner>7) undergoing surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).
Methods: Preoperative VHSTs were performed within one week of strength measurements in 350 patients. The VHST comprises single leg squats, forward box lunges, and lateral and diagonal agility exercises for various periods of time. Scoring is based on time activity is performed and proper form. A passing score is ≥18 out of 20 possible points. Hip flexion, extension, abduction, internal rotation, external rotation, gluteus medius, hamstring, and quadriceps muscle strength was assessed via hand held dynamometry. Preoperative and postoperative patient reported outcomes including modified Harris Hip score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Hip Outcome Score (HOS) were collected. Correlations were assessed using Pearson's r.
Results: Athletes were 26.9±6.5 years, with 34% female and 36% professional athletes. The preoperative mean VHST score was 11.2±6.3. VHST scores were correlated with all strength measurements (r=0.20-0.34, p < 0.01), with the strongest correlation in hip flexion (r=0.33, p< 0.0001) and extension (r=0.34, p< 0.0001). VHST scores were also correlated with pre- and postoperative mHHS (r=0.34, p< 0.001; r=0.20, p=0.002; respectively).
Conclusion: Higher VHST scores are associated with greater hip strength and better patient reported outcomes in the preoperative period. This data supports the use of the VHST as a functional assessment of motion and strength which will help surgeons determine a patient's readiness to return to sport.
Background: Surgeons face a major challenge deciding when athletes are ready to return to sport following hip arthroscopy. Currently, few validated functional tests exist to assess sport readiness. The Vail Hip Sports Test (VHST) was developed to provide a standardized, objective metric for determining readiness to return to sport following hip arthroscopy.
Purpose: To evaluate the association between preoperative Vail Hip Sports Test scores and hip strength measurements in high level athletes (Tegner>7) undergoing surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).
Methods: Preoperative VHSTs were performed within one week of strength measurements in 350 patients. The VHST comprises single leg squats, forward box lunges, and lateral and diagonal agility exercises for various periods of time. Scoring is based on time activity is performed and proper form. A passing score is ≥18 out of 20 possible points. Hip flexion, extension, abduction, internal rotation, external rotation, gluteus medius, hamstring, and quadriceps muscle strength was assessed via hand held dynamometry. Preoperative and postoperative patient reported outcomes including modified Harris Hip score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Hip Outcome Score (HOS) were collected. Correlations were assessed using Pearson's r.
Results: Athletes were 26.9±6.5 years, with 34% female and 36% professional athletes. The preoperative mean VHST score was 11.2±6.3. VHST scores were correlated with all strength measurements (r=0.20-0.34, p < 0.01), with the strongest correlation in hip flexion (r=0.33, p< 0.0001) and extension (r=0.34, p< 0.0001). VHST scores were also correlated with pre- and postoperative mHHS (r=0.34, p< 0.001; r=0.20, p=0.002; respectively).
Conclusion: Higher VHST scores are associated with greater hip strength and better patient reported outcomes in the preoperative period. This data supports the use of the VHST as a functional assessment of motion and strength which will help surgeons determine a patient's readiness to return to sport.
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