Cam morphology and labral tears in asymptomatic international level weightlifters
ESSKA Academy. Briggs K. 11/07/19; 286463; epESMA-65 Topic: Sports Related Injuries
Karen Briggs
Karen Briggs
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You can access free regular educational content on the ESSKA Academy by registering as an 'ESSKA Academy User’ here

Access to Premium content is currently a membership benefit.

Click here to join ESSKA or renew your membership.
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Objective: It has been reported that compared to other sports, ice hockey players more commonly suffer from cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). However, other sports also perform repetitive motions that may put them at risk of developing FAI. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology and labral tears in international level weightlifters.
Methods: 85 elite weightlifters (ages 14 to 40; 24 females, 62 males ) underwent hip screening and ultrasound(US) examination All players were medal winners in national or international competition and average years of competition was 10.6±6 years All players had a clinical hip examination consisting of the FABER test, impingement testing, dial test, Trendelenburg and range of motion measurements. In addition, an US examination of the hip was performed by a certified physician. US was used to diagnose labral tears and document the presence of pincer and cam impingement.
Results: 23 (27%) of the athletes reported prior hip injuries. Sixteen(70%) of these were reported as sports hernias. Cam, pincer or labral tears were observed in 58 athletes (21 bilaterals, 21 left, 16 right). There was no relationship between previous injury and pathology on US.(p=0.873)
In the 170 hips examined, 52 had cam on US. Athletes with cam were significantly older (25 vs 21;p< 0.001) and in weightlifters, females were more likely to have cam(p=0.001). Positive anterior impingement was associated with cam (p=0.027); however no other exam tests or ROM was associated with cam on US. The presence of a labral tear was associated with cam(p< 0.001). Weightlifters with cam were 9.5 [95%CI:4.4 to 19.5] times more likely to have a labral tear. There were no significant differences in ROM between those with cam and those without.
Conclusion: Over 50% of weightlifters had cam or labral tears. Females were more likely to have cam and athletes with cam were more likely to have labral tears. More research is needed to determine if changes in technique or training can prevent progression of these injuries.
Objective: It has been reported that compared to other sports, ice hockey players more commonly suffer from cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). However, other sports also perform repetitive motions that may put them at risk of developing FAI. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology and labral tears in international level weightlifters.
Methods: 85 elite weightlifters (ages 14 to 40; 24 females, 62 males ) underwent hip screening and ultrasound(US) examination All players were medal winners in national or international competition and average years of competition was 10.6±6 years All players had a clinical hip examination consisting of the FABER test, impingement testing, dial test, Trendelenburg and range of motion measurements. In addition, an US examination of the hip was performed by a certified physician. US was used to diagnose labral tears and document the presence of pincer and cam impingement.
Results: 23 (27%) of the athletes reported prior hip injuries. Sixteen(70%) of these were reported as sports hernias. Cam, pincer or labral tears were observed in 58 athletes (21 bilaterals, 21 left, 16 right). There was no relationship between previous injury and pathology on US.(p=0.873)
In the 170 hips examined, 52 had cam on US. Athletes with cam were significantly older (25 vs 21;p< 0.001) and in weightlifters, females were more likely to have cam(p=0.001). Positive anterior impingement was associated with cam (p=0.027); however no other exam tests or ROM was associated with cam on US. The presence of a labral tear was associated with cam(p< 0.001). Weightlifters with cam were 9.5 [95%CI:4.4 to 19.5] times more likely to have a labral tear. There were no significant differences in ROM between those with cam and those without.
Conclusion: Over 50% of weightlifters had cam or labral tears. Females were more likely to have cam and athletes with cam were more likely to have labral tears. More research is needed to determine if changes in technique or training can prevent progression of these injuries.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions

By clicking “Accept Terms & all Cookies” or by continuing to browse, you agree to the storing of third-party cookies on your device to enhance your user experience and agree to the user terms and conditions of this learning management system (LMS).

Cookie Settings
Accept Terms & all Cookies